Yass mother experiences life-changing humanitarian program in Nepal

Learning to let go of the small troubles in life and being more appreciative of everyday blessings are the lessons a Yass mother has understood after recently returning from a humanitarian trip.

Chrissy Worthy was offered a spot among 15 other Australians to traverse a mountainous region of Nepal to assist the small village of Rasnalu, about 200km east of Kathmandu.

“You come back a changed person. Seeing the poverty over there was confronting and just makes you feel like you could do more,” Chrissy said.

The initiative is a joint effort by CHOICE Humanitarian (‘Choice’) and dōTERRA's Healing Hands Foundation (HHF) – two charities that work to alleviate poverty in developing nations.

You come back a changed person. Seeing the poverty over there was confronting and just makes you feel like you could do more. - Chrissy Worthy

HFF is the charity branch of essential oil company doTERRA that partners with communities in which it sources its plants from for its products. In doing so, it aims to improve communities’ social, economic and education standards.

In Rasnalu, it is its wintergreen plants.

Chrissy’s trek began on March 23 and finished on April 1 where she and colleagues spent time working on community projects, which included a new school.

“Part of what we did was pouring foundations for the school with trays loaded with cement. A production line from one person to another. It was really beautiful to be part of.”

Chrissy points to the welcoming part as “one of the most overwhelming” of the trip.

“Some walked two to three hours to come to that ceremony to welcome us, so it was really beautiful. I haven’t stopped crying since I got home, such an amazing experience. The people are so beautiful.”

doTERRA also partner with Days for Girls – an organisation providing education for girls about their menstrual cycle and providing feminine hygiene products they do not otherwise have access to.

“What a difference that’s going make for them. Just making a difference to one person is making a difference to their world.”

The program also included education about sex trafficking and strategies, including self defence, to stop unwanted advances. Some of the men on the trip spoke of the value of women.

“It was an education not just for them but also for me.”

Asked about the most difficult parts of the journey, Chrissy said it was adjusting to the environmental conditions.

“As well, the sleeping conditions weren’t as comfortable as what we are used to, and the toilet facilities were really something to get used to. But none of that bothered me because I was just so grateful to have the opportunity,” she said.

“Also just being away from my children. It was challenging but amazing, and an opportunity not to be missed.”

On the final night, the community members set up a bonfire and danced to traditional music. 

The visitors also had Nepalese cooks who were hired by Choice Humanitarian who hosted a candlelit dinner.

“I’m missing it and I don’t want to go back to my boring food,” Chrissy told the Tribune.

“Being a part of small projects is making differences. We’re building a school for this small community; although it’s only a drop in the ocean, it’s still huge for them.”

Chrissy aims to visit Rasnalu again when the school is finished.

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