$3.74 million for Yass Water Supply Quality Improvement Project

Yass Valley mayor Rowena Abbey with Member for Goulburn Pru Goward
Yass Valley mayor Rowena Abbey with Member for Goulburn Pru Goward

Often described as having a lingering taste of mud and grit, Yass water has been a sore point for local residents for over a decade.

On Tuesday, Member for Goulburn, Pru Goward, announced that the Yass Valley Council would receive $3.74 million in funding for the Yass Water Supply Quality Improvement Project.

“The Yass Valley project will see the upgrade of the existing Yass water treatment plant and the construction of a water pipeline from Yass to Murrumbateman,” Ms Goward said.

Yet the announcement comes as a disappointment to Yass Valley Council, falling short of the $7 million applied for under the NSW Government’s Regional Water and Waste Water Backlog Program.  

The funds applied for would have ensured better tasting water, through the upgrade of the existing Yass water treatment plant, and a complete construction of a water pipeline from Yass to Murrumbateman.

“The pipeline from Yass to Murrumbateman is estimated to cost around $14 million and the Water Treatment Plant around $8 million,” General Manager David Rowe said.

“The complete project will cost the Yass Valley $22 million to complete.”  

Yass council received funds of $6.1 million from the Stronger Regions Funds for the Murrumbateman pipeline in 2015. The $3.74 million, along with past funding, provides under half of the funds necessary to complete the project.

“We now need to assess the financial feasibility and funding implications for Yass water consumer,” Mr Rowe said.  

“We have to do some analysis to see if the whole project is affordable with the small amount being offered.”

Yet, Ms Goward said the project is a positive for Yass, enabling the Yass Valley to benefit from improved access to better quality water and help develop structures and processes for the future.

“$110 million has been provided to construct vital water and sewerage infrastructure in regional towns across the state,” said Ms Goward.

“The funding will help clear a backlog of projects in country towns affected by ongoing water quality and sewerage problems. 

“The program is part of Restart NSW, which provides funding for critical infrastructure across the state to improve both productivity and competitiveness.”