Yass High careers expo by Southerly Jones

THE FUTURE: Yass High students Taylor Wythes and Milli Duncan explore career opportunities. Picture: supplied
THE FUTURE: Yass High students Taylor Wythes and Milli Duncan explore career opportunities. Picture: supplied

It’s a daunting yet exciting task deciding what you want to do in life, and that’s exactly what brought a hive of activity to Yass High School on Wednesday August 1 for the careers expo, set up for years nine, ten, eleven and twelve.

YOUNG WRITER: Southerly Jones shares their experience of Yass High School careers expo 2018. Picture: supplied

YOUNG WRITER: Southerly Jones shares their experience of Yass High School careers expo 2018. Picture: supplied

Our generation (Gen Z, 1995-2009) is predicted to work for over 17 different employers in the span of our working lives, starting from 18. 

With this predicted growth in employment, our generation needs to be flexible and skilled, so which pathways should we pursue in order to meet the expectations our futures hold?

Student ambassadors and other volunteers from universities, colleges and TAFEs based around Canberra and Yass came to our school armed with pamphlets, information, friendly faces and advice for our future workforce.

I was one of the year ten students who took a look at what the different tertiary educators had to offer. There was a wide variety of places to study and acquire skills, such as TAFE NSW Yass, a local study environment convenient for Yass students and beneficial for our community, especially in our rurally situated town.

On the other side of the globe, and the other side of Room IL1, was the Australian Catholic University (ACU), which not only has a campus in Canberra but also in Rome, Italy; a sister campus useful for students interested in studying abroad.

A big thanks to ACU for the free bags as there were armfuls of orientation pamphlets and course guides being carried around haphazardly.

The University of Wollongong (UOW) was a popular table, not only because of its coastal location but because of its subject choices too!

The heaviest course guide booklet I came across was sourced from UOW and the student ambassadors were very helpful to those wanting explanations about future studies.

Canberra Institution of Technology - advertised as the region’s premier vocational education and training provider - drew us in with its extensive range of creative courses. Those in design, fashion and virtual reality were hits with many of the artists and computer pros among us.

When each table had been visited, and each course guide had been flipped through, perhaps the most useful advice of the day given to me by the people representing the University of New South Wales.

They say, make sure you have a plan; choose the subjects you study in your senior high school years in-line with what you want to be doing in later years. And make sure it’s something you enjoy.