Sunningdale Estate: 'Sustainable' development

Murrumbateman could be home to 85 new residential blocks by mid-2020, known as Sunningdale Estate.

Yass Valley Council is expected to vote on the development application for 46 Hillview Drive, rezoned for residential use in 2012, in its October meeting.

Eighty-five new residential blocks proposed for 46 Hillview Drive, Murrumbateman. Picture: Hannah Sparks

Eighty-five new residential blocks proposed for 46 Hillview Drive, Murrumbateman. Picture: Hannah Sparks

The site is owned by Addressing Global Warming, the same company behind the 300-plus residential blocks at Merryville Park and Merryville Estate, Murrumbateman, marketed as ‘ecological developments’.

At Sunningdale Estate, residents would be offered a ‘sustainability package’, a rebate of up to $10,000 per residential block for the construction of solar hot water, solar battery storage, solar panels, water tanks and trees.

Mr Bain said he might use local contractors for the development, but it would come down to cost.

Owner and managing director of Addressing Global Warming, Roger Bain, was also behind the 2013 Ballerina Park wind turbine farm concept, which never progressed, lacking community support.

He said he would look at bringing the concept back if Sunningdale Estate was successful, explaining that “the sustainability argument is growing.”

Mr Bain said he might use local contractors for the development, but it would come down to cost.

To solve this, the developer would build a bridge from the development to Murrumbateman Recreation Grounds.

Five residents have opposed the development as it stands. Among their main concerns is the lack of green space in the development.

To solve this, the developer would build a bridge from the development to Murrumbateman Recreation Grounds.

This raised further concerns for residents, however, over conflicts of use of the space between horse riders and dog owners.

Residents also say the smallest block size on the development (400 square metres) is out of character with the usual, much larger block size in Murrumbateman.

Mr Bain said he didn’t believe the Recreation Grounds were currently used enough to warrant concern.

Residents also say the smallest block size on the development (400 square metres) is out of character with the usual, much larger block size in Murrumbateman.

The development also includes larger blocks, ranging from 800 to 2000 square metres.

Mr Bain said the plan maximised use of the land and infrastructure, including the Yass to Murrumbateman pipeline, expected in 2020.

The Snow family also raised a conflict of interest between their horse farming business and the urban development, worried that people and dogs could threaten biosecurity, livestock and cropping activities.