Sculpture in the Paddock 2018 marquees damaged

Two escapee marquees caused ‘a fruit disaster’ – quite literally – at Sculpture in the Paddock 2018.

The marquees, set up in Shaw Vineyard Estate’s car park, were blown over on Sunday September 23, 24 hours after opening night.

In the chaos, a primary school student’s sculpture – titled A Fruit Disaster – was knocked down and broken.

Sculpture in the Paddock organisers are now holding a re-exhibition of the schools’ sculptures and looking for ways to pay damages.

Sculpture in the Paddock organisers are now holding a re-exhibition of schools’ sculptures and looking for ways to pay for damage. Picture: Al Phemister

Sculpture in the Paddock organisers are now holding a re-exhibition of schools’ sculptures and looking for ways to pay for damage. Picture: Al Phemister

Yass Valley Council and Ginninderry, sponsors of Sculpture in the Paddock, owned the large and small marquees, respectively.

Developers Ginninderry have agreed to cover the cost of their damaged marquee.

But the council will be asking organisers to take care of its repairs, having agreed to provide the marquee free of charge as long as there was “no damage and no cost to council (rate payers),” a council spokesperson said.

Phemister said there were quite a few laughs from organisers about the irony of the broken sculpture’s name.

Sculpture in the Paddock organisers are looking at insurance options, but had only taken out public liability cover for the event.

As for the damaged sculpture, the student from Berinba Public School was a little upset, but became quite optimistic when local sculptor Al Phemister offered to help repair it.

A Fruit Disaster was a bowl made from mesh and plaster, containing plaster fruit and a fake redback spider, which flew away in the flurry and is yet to be found.

Phemister, also the schools’ sculpture project organiser, said he was “quite stunned” that more damage hadn’t been done to other works of art.

He explained, most were made from delicate textiles, such as wire, plaster, fabric and soapstone, a soft material that would break if dropped.

Phemister said there were quite a few laughs from organisers about the irony of the broken sculpture’s title, before “picking up the pieces of the exhibition”.

The re-exhibition is on at The Link at Ginninderry, open seven days, 9am-5pm Mon-Fri and 10am-2pm, Sat and Sun, October 16-28.